Can a police chief put my rehiring to a department vote?

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Can a police chief put my rehiring to a department vote?

I resigned from a job as the Captain/Asst Police Chief after 21 years to pursue a job as a government contractor overseas. Upon leaving a received a letter from the City Manager saying I left good standing and after my contract was satisfied with my contractor job I would be eligible to be hired back into the position I vacated if that position was still vacant. My position had not been filled and after returning from deployment I advised the Chief I was wanting to come back to work. He advised that he would run it by the City Manager and get back to me. When several weeks passed I texted him and asked about my rehire. The Chief informed me that he put it to a vote to the

Asked on April 11, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

It is legal to put a hiring decision to a department or staff vote; it is also legal to simply not want to rehire a prior employee (there is no right to rehiring or re-employment).
Only certain forms of "discrimination" are actually illegal. An employee cannot be denied a job due to his/her race, color national origin, sex, age 40 or over, disability, or religion, or in your state, marital status as well. But an employer may refuse to hire you for any other reason other than these prohibited by law.


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