What to do if the USCIS “supposedly” mailed my wife an I-797 Notice of Action for her I-131 Application for Travel Document, however we never even received it?

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What to do if the USCIS “supposedly” mailed my wife an I-797 Notice of Action for her I-131 Application for Travel Document, however we never even received it?

Now USCIS is requesting we file a I-824 “Application for Action on an Approved Application or Petition”. Since we never even received the I-797 Notice of Action for her Travel Document, should we be liable to pay the required $405 for the I-824? There was no negligence on our part, yet we are being penalized for it, so what can we do?

Asked on July 2, 2012 under Immigration Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The best way to try and resolve the problem that you are writing about is to contact via the telephone the person who sent you the documentation for the I-824 application referencing the $405 fee for it and explain that you never received in the mail the I-797 Notice of Action for the I-131 Application for the Travel Document.

Follow up the conversation with a letter memorializing the conversation.

Potentially the person who you speak with will be realistic with respect to the situation that you have written about and not require the fee or the other application if you get re-sent documents you did not receive completed and returned to the person handling the application as soon as possible.


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