Is it legal or illegal for a college to deny housing (dormortory) to a student who is 26 years old when they advertise they have 21+ housing?

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Is it legal or illegal for a college to deny housing (dormortory) to a student who is 26 years old when they advertise they have 21+ housing?

I am attending Salem State College in Salem MA in the fall and their website says that they have 21+ housing. They had excepted me into the dorms but then called me a week later after they excepted me, and said that they are denying me because I am not the traditional college age (21-24). They even cahed my housing deposit check. What can I do to fight this? Is This even legal? everyone I talk to tells me what Salem is doing is age discrimination. Can you help me?

Asked on May 21, 2009 under Criminal Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

You need to find out what their policy is, if it is in writing and if so where. You also need to inquire as to your check, they do not have a right to the deposit and should have reimbursed you if you were denied housing

Age discrimination is a potential avenue to take here. What you will need to do is contact a local attorney who handles this type of case and ask them for their opinion. This type of meeting is often free and cases like this many times are taken on a contingency basis

You may also want to call the school directly to see where the miscommunication occurred. Make sure to document everything in case you do proceed legally


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