Do I have to pay for my boss to train me at work?

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Do I have to pay for my boss to train me at work?

I am working as a dental receptionist. My co-worker was on a vacation for about a month. My boss was willing to train me because he didn’t want to hire an assistant for that short period of time. I helped him out to do the chair side assisting, sterilizing etc. A couple of days ago I asked  my boss if I can have a compensation or at least appreciation for the “extra” work that I did. He told me he doesn’t owe me anything , I should pay him for being trained. I told him that I don’t want to be an assistant, and he knows that I don’t like to see blood. I was just helping him out. I was shocked to hear that. He doesn’t give me a degree. If I go to school at least I get a degree.

Asked on September 25, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

On the job training programs this is not.  No, I do not believe that you have to pay your boss for the "extra training."  I believe that it was an idle threat on the part of your employer because he was annoyed at your request for additional money.  Maybe it was the way that you phrased the request because I do believe that you should have been paid a higher rate of pay for the type of work that you did rather than as a receptionist.  Here is my concern: are dental technicians required to be licensed in your state?  That may be a problem for you AND for your boss.  But I would approach him again in a kindler and gentler fashion and see what he says.  Otherwise, drop it and find a job where you are appreciated for the extras that you do  Good luck.  


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