Do I have to give permission for a background check when it’s not my employer that is requesting it?

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Do I have to give permission for a background check when it’s not my employer that is requesting it?

I am in medical sales and work for a large well respected company. One of the hospitals that I call on is requiring that I hive permission to run a background Check on me. My employer did a background check when I was hired but the hospital won’t accept it. I explained that if they needed more up to date documentation then my company would run another background check. That would bot accept this and are demanding that I comply. I have no other hospitals on my territory that requires this. All have been accepting of my companies documentation. Do I have to comply?

Asked on August 31, 2011 West Virginia

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to find out why this company (Hospital) is asking for a background check separate and apart from the one you had done through your employer. More importantly, take yourself out of this situation directly and ask your employer to go to bat for you if your employer wishes to keep this hospital as a client. Perhaps the system and agency used by the hospital is more in-depth and it wishes to protect its employees and patients from potential criminals. If this is the case and systems are not equal in terms of the extent and level of background check, then you may indeed have to submit to it. Consider also talking to the state attorney general about this hospital's business practices.


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