Wrongful termination overturned by arbitration

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Wrongful termination overturned by arbitration

I was wrongfully terminated. After I won arbitration some employees admitted that they were made to lie under oath by employer. Since I’ve returned, I’ve been physically assaulted and put back into hostile environment. The employer also owes me back pay and have yet to settle up. What avenues are available for me to not only hold the employer accountable but the employees as well. In addition to the arbitration, I have open case with EEOC and the NLRB. This ordeal has put a major strain on my health. Looking for legal assistance to put all in perspective and make employer pay up for back pay as well as damages

Asked on October 19, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Maryland

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You appear to already be doing just about everything you reasonably could: you have cases with the agencies (EEOC and NLRB) which look into matters like this, and you also have your union working on the matter, too. While you could look to file a lawsuit instead, you are probably best off waiting for the agencies and union to work through these matters: their help is free, whereas if you go the lawsuit route, you would (as a practical matter, given the complexity of claims like these) have to hire and pay for an attorney, the costs of which you would have to bear (you can't make the other side pay in most cases). If you do not receive relief from one or more of the agencies or the union, then you could hire a lawyer to pursue the option of a lawsuit vs. the employer and possibly also against some of your coworkers for defaming you (making an untrue statement of fact about you, which statement harmed you). 
 


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