If I inherited a house that I don’t want, how can I give it to the state?

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If I inherited a house that I don’t want, how can I give it to the state?

I grew up in MI but moved to Australia and relinquished my American citizernship (I became a citizen of Australia).I have lived there for approximately 40 years. My brother died 12/31/09. The property in MI is named in his Will with joint rights of survivorship to myself. I was aware of this and a deed was registered with the county in 1985 after the death of my mother. I had a real estate agent check the chain of title. Title was with my father in 1950. He died in 1963 and there are no other records until the deed.

Asked on September 3, 2010 under Estate Planning, Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry for your loss.  The deed that you are speaking of that lists you and your brother came from the estate of your mother no doubt and was an Executor's deed I assume.  What you appear to want to do is gift the property to the state of Michigan.  I am unclear as to how this can be done and it may be best to contact an attorney in the state to arrange such as transaction.  But you may also want to speak with an accountant and see if it would be more advantageous (and quite possibly an easier and more appreciated transaction) if you gifted the house to a non for profit organization that can use that home for a specific purpose.  I am not advocating any organization here but maybe a children's cancer hospital to use for temporary housing for families that come to the area for treatment (like the Ronald McDonald houses) or for a shelter for battered families.  I can't see the state doing much with the house other than selling it or tearing it down.  It seems that it can be used for so much more through your generosity.  Good luck.


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