Who is responsible for paying to have city sewer installed when an easement is placed?

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Who is responsible for paying to have city sewer installed when an easement is placed?

I recently purchased a home, and a few days after moving in I received a letter that the rock river reclamation district was going to have an open hearing to answer questions about the proposal to hookup my subdivision with city sewer. I read more and it said the cost to me, would be $7,500, payable over 10 years with 5% interest. This easement was not disclosed to me during the selling process, and the easement seems to have been placed before the title was in my name. Is it going to be my responsibility to pay for a service I don’t need, since I have working septic? Is it the old owners?

Asked on September 28, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In most situations, if a property owner gets the benefits of city sewer and its hook up to his or her home, then the homeowner is obligated to pay for the hook up and the monthly fees for it. If you do not want the hook up, you need to contest it and request that you wish to have your home that you recently purchased remain on the septic system that it is currentl one.

It is very important for you to write the reclamation district a letter opposing your home's hook up to the septic system so it is part of the public record if that it your wishes and the reasons for the opposition. You should also get your other neighbors who do not want the hook up (assuming you do not) to do the same and all need to attend the public hearing to voice your opposition.


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