When does abuse of power/harassment occur by a police officer?

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When does abuse of power/harassment occur by a police officer?

One of my neighbors is a police officer not in our town, but in the town where I work. One day, while driving home from work, he pulled me over. He approached my vehicle and asked if I knew who he was. He proceeded to tell me that he lived on my street. He said that he felt that I drove a little fast sometimes on our street and ‘he never said anything to me because it was not his jurisdiction.’ He then said, ‘but this is my jurisdiction.’ He then told me to slow down on our street. After all of this, he told me that he pulled me over for my window tint. He then sent me on my way with NO warning about the window tint, just telling me to slow down on our street. Today the same officer pulled me over on my way to work. I immediately asked him why he pulled me over and he replied, ‘because of your window tint.’ He issued me a warning and a 10 day notice to remove the window tint. I feel that he is simply targeting me for window tint when he really wants to get me for, what he considers, speeding in our neighborhood. Is there anything that I can do about this?

Asked on March 16, 2018 under General Practice, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If the tint is legal, you could file a complaint with the police department for his harassing you when you have done nothing wrong. But if the tint is illegal (e.g. more than is allowed), his motives do not matter: if you violate the law, an office can stop you, warn you, or issue you a citation for it.


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