What would the charges be if I placed a speed bump in a public street?

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What would the charges be if I placed a speed bump in a public street?

I’m having trouble with a few people driving 60 mph on my street, the local police can’t seem to stop it so I was debating on ordering a speedbump from a safety supply store and putting it in front of my home. What can I be charged with and could those charges be beaten?

Asked on July 9, 2011 under Criminal Law, Arkansas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can obstruct a public street and by placing an uncommissioned and unapproved speed bump in the road could place you and the city in dire legal danger. If anyone gets into an accident in any way shape or form, you can be sued for such obstruction. The best approach is to go and speak with your local politicians, state and federal politicians. Talk the commission and agencies who handle placement of such speed bumps on public streets. This agency is usually the department of transportation. Talk at mayoral public meetings, take pictures and video and show what happens. You will be surprised that you can probably get more action this way. Take it to the newspaper if you have to but bottom line, the police do not have jurisdiction to get you the speed bump and it is not cost effective for them to be called out every time there is speeding.


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