What happens when a nursing home trys to collect what they call an outstanding balanceif there is no money in the patients account?

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What happens when a nursing home trys to collect what they call an outstanding balanceif there is no money in the patients account?

My uncle went into a nursing home in May. We were told Medicare was going to cover the expenses for May. We filed all the paperwork in May for Medicaid). He receives $1400 a month from social security and has no assets. They billed me $1200 a month from June until now. Medicaid has kicked in and they will now take all but $60 of his social security check. I am on his checking account. I paid some bills with the $200 difference and also started to pay a little back to myself because he owed me $5000. Now the nursing home wants the $200 difference.

Asked on November 13, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Connecticut

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Ok, well you need to go and seek help with the $5000 loan issue because you can not pay yourself money as a payment back if you have not established the loan.  In fact, you need help with the entire issue here.  Medicaid rules are very particular with funds transfers.  They look to make sure that they are transferred legitimately to people.  Without a note or other agreement for the money you could be out of luck.  If the bills were his an legitimate I think that you can make a case for not giving them that money.  The loan repayment will be an issue though.  Again, double check on all this please.  Good luck.


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