What does it mean if you have a warrant of conspiracy to manufacture with drugs?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What does it mean if you have a warrant of conspiracy to manufacture with drugs?

Asked on April 15, 2009 under Criminal Law, Alabama

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

1. Here is the definition of conspiracy:

Section 13A-4-3

Criminal conspiracy generally.

(a) A person is guilty of criminal conspiracy if, with the intent that conduct constituting an offense be performed, he agrees with one or more persons to engage in or cause the performance of such conduct, and any one or more of such persons does an overt act to effect an objective of the agreement.

(b) If a person knows or should know that one with whom he agrees has in turn agreed or will agree with another to effect the same criminal objective, he shall be deemed to have agreed with such other person, whether or not he knows the other's identity.

(c) A person is not liable under this section if, under circumstances manifesting a voluntary and complete renunciation of his criminal purpose, he gave a timely and adequate warning to law enforcement authorities or made a substantial effort to prevent the enforcement of the criminal conduct contemplated by the conspiracy. Renunciation by one conspirator, however, does not affect the liability of another conspirator who does not join in the abandonment of the conspiratorial objective. The burden of injecting the issue of renunciation is on the defendant, but this does not shift the burden of proof.

(d) It is no defense to a prosecution for criminal conspiracy that:

(1) The person, or persons, with whom defendant is alleged to have conspired has been acquitted, has not been prosecuted or convicted, has been convicted of a different offense or is immune from prosecution, or

(2) The person, or persons, with whom defendant conspired could not be guilty of the conspiracy or the object crime because of lack of mental responsibility or culpability, or other legal incapacity or defense, or

(3) The defendant belongs to a class of persons who by definition are legally incapable in an individual capacity of committing the offense that is the object of the conspiracy.

(e) A conspirator is not liable under this section if, had the criminal conduct contemplated by the conspiracy actually been performed, he would be immune from liability under the law defining the offense or as an accomplice under Section 13A-2-24.

(f) Liability as accomplice. - Accomplice liability for offenses committed in furtherance of a conspiracy is to be determined as provided in Section 13A-2-23.

(g) Criminal conspiracy is a:

(1) Class A felony if an object of the conspiracy is murder.

(2) Class B felony if an object of the conspiracy is a Class A felony.

(3) Class C felony if an object of the conspiracy is a Class B felony.

(4) Class A misdemeanor if an object of the conspiracy is a Class C felony.

(5) Class B misdemeanor if an object of the conspiracy is a Class A misdemeanor.

(6) Class C misdemeanor if an object of the conspiracy is a Class B misdemeanor.

(7) Violation if an object of the conspiracy is a Class C misdemeanor.

 

2. http://www.legislature.state.al.us/CodeofAlabama/1975/coatoc.htm

*review Article 5 Drug Offenses

3. warrant -- the warrant sounds like one for the person's arrest for the conspiracy to manufacture drugs. Not sure under which warrant so check out this link: http://www.legislature.state.al.us/CodeofAlabama/1975/coatoc.htm

 

4. If someone has such an arrest warrant, and hasn't been arrested or turned himself/herself in, then I would think the best bet is to contact a criminal defense attorney in your state. Try attorneypages.com and then cross reference with the Alabama state bar.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption