What doI do when my union won’t do anything about nepotism in the workplace?

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What doI do when my union won’t do anything about nepotism in the workplace?

I’ve worked at this grocery store for the past 11 half years. Due to layoffs me and 100+ people were laid off. We were given no notice, just a phone call Friday morning saying I would be laid off next Friday. I was given the options to step down to a lower position and take a 60% pay cut or take the layoff. I took the layoff. Now 4 months later, some of the stores are promoting lower position kids into our old positions. The kids getting promoted are all sons and daughters of management. We have a union but they have not done anything.

Asked on September 22, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

1) If there is a union or collective bargaining agreement which addresses nepotism, hiring, promotion, etc., you may be able to bring a legal action to enforce it, even if the union itself does not.

2) Union representatives have certain obligations to the union; if the union reps are not fulfilling their obligations, it may be possible to compel them to do so.

3) It may also be possible--though difficult--to change which union your shop belongs to, if you believe another union would represent your interests better.

4) If your union is part of a national one, if the local representatives aren't doing their jobs, try contacting national and making them aware of the situation.

There should therefore be some recourse or options. You should consult with a labor law attorney to see which options are the best for you. Good luck.


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