What do I do to get my daughter back if my parents are her conservators?

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What do I do to get my daughter back if my parents are her conservators?

She is 1 and I’m 18. I left home because my parents and I don’t get along. While living there my daughter’s dad didn’t want her and I didn’t know how to support her so my parents became her management conservators, then she could be on my stepmom’s insurance. I left and went to live with my mom. While I was at school my parents took her away. Ever since then I can only get her every other Friday at my grandmother’s house not my apartment. Honestly I really just want my baby back. Can someone please help?

Asked on February 1, 2012 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You really need to show you can actually suppport your child and be able to handle all of the responsibilities of parenthood including being financially responsible, keeping her in a safe environment and showing you can care for her. Your parents will use your pattern of abandonment and leaving against you in court so you need to really make sure this is in your daughter's best interest. The court will look at factors like stability, income, time with your child and other factors. You need to be ready. Consult with a family law attorney who can help you get everything ready, providing and gathering proof of your ability to be responsible and your willingness to handle the job. Make sure you have the right people behind you, including witnesses and possibly supervisors (if you have a job) or teachers if you are in school. Go with the mantra that this is the best route for your child and be positive.


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