What can we legally post to avoid problem visitors to our property?

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What can we legally post to avoid problem visitors to our property?

We own an apartment building in PA. We have one tenant who is pushing eviction by having friends over and hanging out on the front porch. The friends are young adults and they at times get loud and unruly. The place have been called and citations given for noise and once for fighting. We are handing that tenant but we also want to post something about loitering. We are not sure what we can legally post and also do not want to do something that would inhibit the grandparent in the building from doing things like blowing bubbles with her granddaughter on the porch.

Asked on August 24, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

First, note that unless your lease(s) already give you the right to change terms or conditions, or post general building terms that all tenants have to adhere to, you cannot impose conditions on tenants about their guests or behaviors in the middle  of a lease term. Without the rights or freedom discussed above, you'd need to wait until leases renew and change them appropriately. Of course, if the leases already reference any terms, conditions, building rules, etc. (without specifying exactly what they are and locking you into what's specified in the lease) then you can change and then enforce them.

Assuming can impose building rules, you can post anything you like that's not illegal (e.g. housing discrimination). You  have identified the problem--not prohibiting desired behavior. If you are concerned about behavior that rises to the level of citations, then you might make the conditions or rules reflect it. E.g. that if any tenant receives more than two citations in one 12-month period for him/herself or his/her guests, that tenant may be evicted.

 


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