What canI do if the painting franchise that contracted me to paint a house won’t pay for work that I completed?

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What canI do if the painting franchise that contracted me to paint a house won’t pay for work that I completed?

I’m a painting contractor that does work for a painting franchise. After completing 90% of the job the customer “fired” me but refused to give me a reason nor would the franchise owner who now refuses to pay for the work that was done. The franchise claimed they had to have someone else in to re-do most of the job. 1 week later, the franchise owner said there were paint streaks all over the hardwood floor which isn’t true. The project manager admitted he saw no paint on floor. The customer never said there was paint on floor when she fired us. Franchise has been paid but won’t pay me.

Asked on August 20, 2011 Iowa

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you have a written contract to have done what you did on this job you write about and are a licensed painting contractor, here are your options:

1. if you have pre-liened the work of improvement, complete the process for this lien to perfect it and be ready to file a lawsuit to foreclose on your mechanic's lien on the customer's property;

2. write the franchise owner and the customer who terminated you a letter with an invoice for services rendered and a due date for payment. Keep a copy for future reference and need;

3. if you are not paid for the services rendered in the period stated in your sent letter and invoice, your option is to bring a legal action for services rendered which have not been paid.

Given the claims against you and your work as being the reasons why you were oulled from the job, you should consider consulting with an attorney experienced in construction law.

Good luck.


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