What are the law regarding alandlord checking your mail?

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What are the law regarding alandlord checking your mail?

My landlord has stated they believe more people are living with me because of the mail coming to my house with a name on it that is not mine not on the lease (my deceased mother). Without knowing the law and limitations I didn’t address this over the phone but how would she know this without snooping in my mail? Isn’t there a federal law against this? I wanted to catch her by calling and asking her how did she came up on the mail in a nice tone but record the conversation. In TN you’re allowed to record the other party without their knowing, correct?

Asked on September 22, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Under federal law, only people who have permission may open another person's male. If your landlord is actually opening mail addressed to you, he or she is in violation of federal law.

As to looking at your mail without opening it, that is a different question depending upon the type of mail box that you have. A mail person is entitled to deposit mail in your post box and remove it. Likewise, sometimes friends will pick up and drop off information in one's mail box, but that is with permission, express or implied.

If you landlord is going through your mailbox that is solely for you, that is not acceptable.

In California it is against the law to record a telephone conversation without all parties knwing beforehand. I have no idea what Tennessee law is on the subject. I would error on the side of caution recording a telephone conversation with the landlord regarding the mail issue.

Rather, I would have a face to face meeting with the landlord with a third party witness present on the subject.


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