What are my rights as a tenant in a house which has had a wall collapse due to termites?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What are my rights as a tenant in a house which has had a wall collapse due to termites?

I spoke with my landlord about bugs consuming my rented home and she said it was my responsibility to fumigate the location. After her refusal to do the needed fumigation, the bathroom wall collapsed due to termites. She quickly fixed the wall and then she fumigated the home. Termite infestation causes the house to be in unhealthy living condition and since damage has already begun to show, I assume that there is more damage to come even though the house has finally been rid of bugs and termites. What are my rights in this situation?

Asked on July 18, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Read your written lease with the landlord concerning the property you are renting assuming you have a written lease. Most written leases have provisions concerning the obligations of the landlord and the tenant concerning the rented property and possibilty maintenance and repairs. The written lease typically controls on such issues.

If there is no written contract for you or the written contract does not address insect infestation, most States in this country have laws requiring the landlord to provide to his or her tenant premises that are safe and habitable. The termite infestation and collapsed wall sounds like a health and safety issue for you.

Potentially the rent you are paying monthly could be reduced due to poor living condition. Prhaps you might want to call the county building and permit inspector for structures to view the property you are renting?

If the conditions of the home you are renting are so unsafe, potentially you can end your lease sooner rather than later (immediately).

Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption