Was in training for new job and was told im not a fit? Can i get out if my rental lease?

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Was in training for new job and was told im not a fit? Can i get out if my rental lease?

I just moved to a new town for a job and in the
middle of training, was told im not a good fit. Now im
stuck with this huge rent i cant afford, can i get out of
this lease? Ive been here only a week and 1/2.. Im
upset and they have no 1 bedrooms available..

Asked on August 4, 2016 under Real Estate Law, South Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, unemployment is not typically a reason to break a lease. However, have you read your lease because possibly there is language in it relating to this. If not, then you are not entitled to terminate your lease early; you remain liable for rent until the end of the lease term. That having been said, your landlord is under a duty to "mitigate damages", which means that they must use reasonable efforts to find a new tenant after you move out.  If, this happens, you will then be released from any further rental obligation.
In order to expedite things, do you know someone who would like take over your space? Also, you ask your landlord if you can sublet your unit. If you can, then you could charge your subtenant less than what you are paying but at least you would have some monetary relief. You should note however, with a sublease you will still remain liable for the rent if your subtenant fails to pay it. Finally, your ex-employer may be able to offset some of your rental expenses; check with its HR department.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

No, your personal economic, employment, or financial situation is not legal grounds to get out of a lease. The lease is a contract between you and the landlord; that contract is not affected by changes in your circumstances or by the actions of a third party (your employer) who was not part of the lease. Similarly, getting a job elsewhere is not grounds to get out of the lease--only if *the landlord* violates the lease in some major or "material" way would you have grounds to get out of it.


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