Who is best to be the resonsible party for a vacation rental?

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Who is best to be the resonsible party for a vacation rental?

A group of graduating high school seniors are planning to take a summer vacation rental. Most, if not all, of the kids will be 18 years old at the time of the vacation. The landlord wants a signed contract. He is requiring either one of the kids to sign as responsible party; providing a member of the party is at least 18 years of age or a parent. Is it better for an 18 year old to sign as responsible/liable party or a parent? If all parents sign a statement as equally responsible it would be separate from the contract, as the landlord will not all this as part of his contract. Is this legal? What’s the best way to proceed?

Asked on February 5, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Maybe you should find a rental with a landlord that will allow each person to sign the agreement (or each persons parent) and make sure that they are each liable for their share, although no landlord will want to have to go chasing each individual party and no parent in their right mind is going to become liable for the entire place and then have to sue each of the other parties based upon a separate agreement.  Shares in summer rentals are often dine in places like the Hamptons on Long Island where one party signs the contract and really sublets out the rest of the place as "shares".  And I am sure that as long as the contract does not prevent it (technically it is subletting) then you are fine.  But your parents are all going to have to make this decision if you need to rent it now and you are all minors.  No one can give you that kind of guidance in this forum.  Good luck.


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