What happens to a sponsor if a visa holder illegally overstays their visit?

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What happens to a sponsor if a visa holder illegally overstays their visit?

My husband is a US citizen he is also an Active Duty soldier if it makes any difference. His brother lives in the Ukraine and wants to come here with a student visa. He wants my husband to be his sponsor. Which is fine with me. However, what I do have a problem with is the fact that he is planning of staying here illegally after his visa expires. I would like to know if it will effect my husband in any way as his sponsor or his brother?

Asked on December 28, 2011 under Immigration Law, California

Answers:

Dustin Bankston / Bankston Immigration Law Office

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

The point of having a sponsor is to prove that the visa holder will not become a public charge in the United States.  In other words, the sponsor requirement is in place to help insure that the the visa holder will not need government assistance from social programs such as welfare.  Technically, a government agency that pays money to the visa holder could hold the sponsor responible to repay any government assistance rendered to the visa holder.

Other than the financial responsibility, I am not aware of any other obligations the sponsor has to the visa holder.  I do not believe the sponsor has a duty to insure the visa holder maintains his immigration status.

 


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