If someone walked into my car while my friend was driving, what should I do?

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If someone walked into my car while my friend was driving, what should I do?

I had a friend drive me and another friend home last night. We turned into the parking lot at the dorms, and the driver thought it would be funny to play a little prank on some other students in the parking lot. He stopped in the crosswalk while a (seemingly) drunken student was about 4-5 feet away. This student walked into my car, took a few steps back, and took down my license plate number as we drove away. Later, I had returned and my friend parked my car in this very same lot. 2 police officers then knocked on my door and various other doors in my hall looking for me, accompanied by what hall mates described as a very angry female student. I did not answer my door. Am I legally/financially liable? Is this hit and run? Will me or my friend who was driving receive any serious consequences? If so, What? What should I do?

Asked on January 21, 2012 under Accident Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Techincally what happened was a hit and run despite the fact that the pedestrian ran into the car that you were a passenger in. The problem for you is that although you were not driving the vehicle involved in the incident, the vehicle was yours and apparently the person who ran into the car took down the license number resulting in law enforcement looking for you.

From what you have written, the person who accused you or rather your car of the incident, does not seem that injured. I suggest that if law enforcement wants to meet with you about the incident, you need to cooperate with the process and tell the truth.

As to serious conesequences resulting from the incident, it all depends on how cooperative you are and whether or not the person who ran into the car was actually injured.


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