Should I have to pay for a meter if the city I live in temporarily blocks my driveway with snow?

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Should I have to pay for a meter if the city I live in temporarily blocks my driveway with snow?

The city made a decision to plow the snow in city streets to the center of the road to eliminate the snow crowded sidewalks of years past. I park in an area connected to the theatre that I work for that has a singular access point on Walnut Street. Walnut Street was plowed out ward forcing the snow from the street to block my entry to the parking area. I parked on a city street in front of a meter got a shovel and started clearing my way. I was cited. My only options where to pay for a meter or pay for a city ramp. They forced me to pay while I wait to clear out my path.

Asked on January 13, 2012 under Business Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you were cited while you parked on the city street while you were shoveling snow on a city street to get access to your driveway because the city plowed snow from the street towards the sidewalk, you should contest the citation because you would not have received it had your driveway not been blocked by snow thrown by city snow removal equipment. You would have been able to simply pull into the driveway.

I would make sure I have the date, time and location to have a hearing on the citation your received written down and go attend it if you believe that you were unjustly cited for parking in the street and not paying for meter time. I would also contact your mayor and council person as to what transpired.


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