What to do about rotting trees on my rental property?

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What to do about rotting trees on my rental property?

There are dangerous trees in my yard. Some are rotting. Some are starting to lose huge branches. I have tried contacting my management company several times and they won’t get back to me. Can you direct me as to what to do? I am not supposed to alter the conditions of the property without permission, so I don’t know if I can cut the trees down. On the other hand, this poses a risk to me, my guests and my property. The lease states that I am to maintain the yard but it also states that the landlord is responsible for keeping the property conditions a safe environment. Can I do it myself and deduct from rent?

Asked on February 7, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you are renting a unit where there are dabgerous conditions on the grounds and the property management company is not responsive to you concerning the rotting trees on the property and rectifying the problem, I would write the company once a week for several weeks requesting the need to resolve the problem. Keep a copy of the letters for future use and need. You might wish to contact your local fire department to see if the trees pose a fire danger or some other governmental entity that has public safety duties concerning the problem you are writing about.

From what you have written, you are not allowed under state law to make the the property conditions safe and then deduct the costs for doing so as to exterior issues of the rental.


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