How doesno fault comprehensive versus collision coverage work?

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How doesno fault comprehensive versus collision coverage work?

A gravel truck dropped enough gravel along a busy road to cause damage to approximately 15 cars. A police report was filed. I live in a state with no-fault insurance. My agent tells me that this falls under the no-fault comprehensive part of my insurance versus collision because he didn’t actually hit my car with his truck and therefore I am responsible to pay my $1000 deductible; the gravel truck just gets away free and clear. Is this true?

Asked on February 15, 2012 under Accident Law, Michigan

Answers:

Zachary Ballin / Ballin & Associates, LLC

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

This is not necessarily true.  You are certainly entitled to no-fault benefits, but you may also be entitled to collision coverage under the trucks policy, which is most likely substantial.  The answer will depend on the auto policy covering the truck and judicial opinions interpreting the policy's language.  There may also be legislation in your state dictating what must be covered.  You should contact an attorney immediately.  Your agent is not an attorney and is doing you no favors.  Your instinct is correct though, if he did something wrong with his truck that caused harm, it should not matter that it was caused directly with the truck itself.


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