Question about criminal trespassing in the state of Texas

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Question about criminal trespassing in the state of Texas

Last March my husband kicked a door as he was leaving the office of a HUD apartment complex we used to live at. A few days later, we recieved a letter stating nither one of us could come back under threat of criminal trespassing. Is this legal grounds for this threat for him, and how could it be for me as I was not even there. If it is legal does it expire? And does there have to be just cause to renew it or can it be done out of spite? I have friends still living there and they have been told they will have a mark against them towards their eviction if I/we are caught in their apartment.

Asked on April 14, 2009 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

N. K., Member, Iowa and Illinois Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 13 years ago | Contributor

In Texas, criminal trespass includes entering property of another without consent when the person has notice (oral or written) that entry is forbidden.

Since both you and your husband received a letter informing you not to come back to the complex, you have received legal notice. There is no expiration and if you or your husband return to the complex, you could be charged with criminal trespass.

As for your friends, HUD housing units usually have their own set of rules and regulations regarding visitors. Depending on what the regulations are, you could be jeopardizing your friends' tenancy.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption