What to do if my ex-employer refuses to give information to the government which is costing me needed benefits?

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What to do if my ex-employer refuses to give information to the government which is costing me needed benefits?

I was receiving food stamps from the state. I was employed when I applied. About 5 months ago I lost my job. I got a letter saying that I had to renew my case. I did the phone interview and sent all the papers needed. My previous employer had to fill out a form of my employment there. I faxed the form numerous times. They will not fax the form back to my local office. Now my case is being terminated due to “failure to cooperate in verification” of my previous employment. Do I have a case against my former employer? It is stressing me out mentally.

Asked on May 3, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

No, unfortunately, your employer is not under an obligation to fill out any forms or provide any assistance or help if it does not want to. However, you should be able to provide evidence and documentation in other ways; e.g. pay stubs, copies of pay checks, statements from a payroll processor, a W-2 from last year, etc. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in benefits cases--there should be some other way you can provide the required information. If you can't afford an attorney, try contacting legal aid or legal services, who provide legal help to those who can't pay for it and who typically have lawyers experienced in cases such as this. Also try contacting your local elected official(s) (state assemblymen, etc.); it may possible that their office(s) can help.


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