Potentionally being forced out of my job after an outside company was hired

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Potentionally being forced out of my job after an outside company was hired

I work for a school’s tech department. My boss retired and the administrator brought in a company to manage us. They haven’t been managing us, as they as just kind of taking control of everything in name. Since they were hired, there has been an uptake in system failures, data loss, and computers going down. Myself and another technician are being blamed for these problems, and being called incompetent, however we are also being forced to fix the problems, sometimes some of them repeatedly. The admin is aware of the situation and in meetings, they complete side with the company while admitting to having no knowledge of what we are talking about. My personal information has been given out to the company without my permission, and they have continuous expectations of making me work when I am not on the clock to fix these errors.

Asked on April 21, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, unless you have a written employment contract (including a union or collective bargaining agreement) which is still in effect (unexpired) and which protects your job, you can be forced out; you can be required to fix others' problems; you can be blamed for things which you did not do; you can be required to work after your normal work hours; etc. That's because in the absence of a written employment contract, all employment in this nation is "employment at will." That means that you don't have any rights to a job, any protection for a job, or even any right to be treated fairly or only terminated for things you did. An employee at will can be terminated--or anything less than termination, such as making the job wholly unpleasant, or being demoted, etc.--at any time, for any reason. Your employer can side with the outside company over you.
If you do have a written employment or union agreement, review what it says; you have whatever rights and protections it gives you.


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