What to do if I just did a background check on myself an I apparently have a outstanding warrant for a DUI from 4 years ago?

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What to do if I just did a background check on myself an I apparently have a outstanding warrant for a DUI from 4 years ago?

I talked to the officer that night an he requested i ride in the ambulance. The hospital released me very quickly an told me I could leave. A few days later I recieved my drivers license in the mail an that was it. Nothing more ever came of it. Ive been ticketed twice since then for no seatbelt in the same county an they never said anything. I want to clear this up ASAP. What advise do you have an should I be able to get rid of this?

Asked on November 13, 2012 under Criminal Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need to do one of two things (or potentially both).  If you can afford an attorney, it will go much more quickly for you.  The first step is to address the criminal case.  If you call to inquire about the warrant, and the warrant is still active, they you will have tipped them off on where you are at, and you may get arrested before you have had a chance to really plan for this situation.  An attorney, however, can make some advance phone calls and see if they can resolve the charges and get the warrant lifted without you even having to go to jail.  If they case has not been formally filed in any court, then the chances are the warrant could be on your record in error.  If the warrant is not in error, you may still have a good chance at a dismissal or conditional dismissal considering the amount of time that has already passed with no prosecutorial effort.

Once you get then criminal case resolved, preferrably with a dismissal, then you can look at using the same attorney to help you get it off of your record so that it won't haunt your employment aspects later.


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