How to get an ex-spouse to follow a court order?

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How to get an ex-spouse to follow a court order?

My mother has legal divorce papers saying that my father will pay her $100,000. It has been 7 years and he has not paid. Is it too late for her to get it? This is not even close to half their assests. They were married for 40 years. He says he will hire someone to kill her or one of their children if she tries to get anything from him. He has put all property in the name of his new wife. Now says he has nothing for her to take. He is making her leave the house she lives in (he owns it) because he says he doesn’t want their grandson living with her. She is 73 years old, and now is trying to find a job. While they were married he would not let her work so she has nothing to appeal to an employer. She is very afraid of him and his threats.

Asked on November 3, 2010 under Family Law, Kentucky

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

1) Anyone must follow a court  order; they are mandatory, not voluntary.

2) Threatening someone's life or extorting them is a crime.

3) Hiding assets from a court may consitute fraud.

Your father is doing many bad and even illegal things for which he can be sued or even possibly prosecuted. The key is, your mother will need to take action: she can get a lawyer to enforce the court order; she can report his threats to the police; she could try suing him for harassment; she could seek an order of protection; etc. However, she has to act; if she does nothing, she will continue to be victimized. She should begin by discussing matters with a good divorce or matrimonial attorney.


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