If my lease is coming due, do I have to let my business partner on the lease agreement?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If my lease is coming due, do I have to let my business partner on the lease agreement?

My partner of almost 1 year is a manipulative back stabbing person. He did not want on the first lease because he was afraid of the business not taking off. Now that things are going well, he has tried to get me kicked out of the shop and offered to take over my lease. I went to upper management of the company that manages the property and they told me that if I’m not doing anything illegal and not behind on rent that I am safe. Now with the lease coming due, he is trying once again to manipulate lower management to kick me and let him have the whole shop to himself. What do I do?

Asked on November 11, 2010 under Business Law, Nebraska

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Do you have a partnership agreement?  Is it written?  Then go and see an attorney as to his breaching the agreement, because doing anything adverse to your interests is a breach.  I would also ask the attorney to bring a motion to enjoin him from whatever actions he is doing that goes against your interests.  And speak with him about getting out of the agreement and suing for the right to the store, the name - whatever you think you may be entitled to here.  Think also about buying him out.  That may be an option to get him out of your hair one and for all and worth every penny. Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption