What is my liability if my girlfriend received surgery for a life threatening issuebut she has not been able to pay the billsand I signed the admission papers?

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What is my liability if my girlfriend received surgery for a life threatening issuebut she has not been able to pay the billsand I signed the admission papers?

Now my girlfriend is the defendant in a small claims case demanding payment for her surgery (she would have died without it) and I have been named a co-defendant. I signed papers admitting her the hospital, but nothing that I can recall specifically making me responsible for her medical bills. How can I be named as co-defendant? I don’t mind helping with the bill, but I feel I been wrongfully named as a debtor and this has badly affected my credit (which incidentally, I might have been able to use to get a loan to help her pay her bills).

Asked on January 17, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Oregon

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you did not sign any written document with the health care provider stating clearly that you would be responsible for your girlfriend's medical bills that you are being sued for, then under the law of your state you should not be legally liable for her health care cost payment, she would be.

You need to carefully read the admission papers that you signed to make sure that you did not unknowingly sign documentation stating that you are responsible for her health care bill.

I suspect one of the reasons you are being named as a defendant in the action is due to the hospital wanting as many people responsible to pay the outstanding bill of your girlfriend.


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