If my ex-boyfriend brought me a car and we have now broken up, can he get it back?

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If my ex-boyfriend brought me a car and we have now broken up, can he get it back?

He was in the Marines in Hawaii back in January. I was looking for a new car to replace my old one but was having problems getting financed. He volunteered to be a co-signer on a car with me so I can get approved. Co-signing didn’t work, so he decided on his own to apply for a loan through his bank to get me the car as a gift. He gave me Power of Attorney from Hawaii and they e-mailed me a copy of it to take to the bank and pick up the check. I purchased the car I wanted. I make my payments on time and wire the money to his account which pays automatically. The insurance is in my name also.

Asked on July 12, 2011 under Business Law, Maryland

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If the car is in your name as its registered owner, it is your car as a matter of law. Your former boyfriend cannot legally take the car from you without your permisison. As long as you make its payments you cannot lose it.

It seems that since you have made all payments on the car and pay its insurance, your former boyfriend's contribution to the car is solely his co-signing on the loan. If you somehow stop making payment on the car when payments are still due, you and your boyfriend can be on the hook fori ts repossession, eventual re-sale and possibly a deficiency judgment.

As long as you are making its payments, there should be no issue about your former boyfriend wanting the car.

Good question.


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