If my aunt loaned me money to purchase a vehicle, doI have to pay that back since she has passed away?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If my aunt loaned me money to purchase a vehicle, doI have to pay that back since she has passed away?

I took a year out of my life to rehab my special aunt. She wanted me to have a car so I could be with her 24/7 and have transportation for purposes of caring for her. She paid for a car for me and we wrote a loan agreement for which all payments have been respected. We discussed that if she passed away before the car was paid off then I wouldn’t not have to make more payments, we expected her to live a lot longer. Now the executor of her estate, her long lost daughter, is requesting document of payments and how I intend to pay off the loan. Do I have to pay that or prove payment?

Asked on August 27, 2011 Oregon

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I am so sorry for your loss and for your present situation.  Unfortunately you are not in the best of situations.  The executor of the estate of your Aunt has the right to ask what she has asked about the document you signed.  The debt is documented and it is a debt owed to the estate.  You should consider speaking with an attorney on the matter and discuss the possibility of valuing the time you spent as a caregiver to your Aunt for purposes of billing the estate.  It is a legitimate expense that she would have had to incur in the event you were not available and her daughter got off easy while you bore the brunt of it all.  Then maybe she will wipe out the car loan.  Good luck to you. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption