If I gave notice to move but now can’t do to a medical condition, what are my rights?

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If I gave notice to move but now can’t do to a medical condition, what are my rights?

My apartments has the 60 day notice for moving and I sent mine in as requested. But I had surgery three weeks before and feel it unwise to move until I have healed. However they want me to move either to another apartment in the community or move out. Can they force me to move? The same apartments at time of signing original lease stated they would paint a disabled space for my car. Then 2 weeks after I moved in they stated they never said that but was looking for a covered space I could rent. Total lie. I have paid rent on time and am not a problem tenant. The surgery was an implant for pain. I pay quite a bit above the normal for rent. I am on fixed income of $2,030 for disability retirement.

Asked on November 22, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you sent your landlord a 60 day notice to vacate and the notice was accepted by your landlord, then technically you have an accepted offer by your landlord to end your lease. If you do not want to end your lease at this point due to health conditions, then you should speak with your landlord about the changed circumstances and try to obtain a reasonable extension of the time for your move out.

Another option is to take another rental in the complex short term. From what you have written, your landlord can now force you to move. Whether or not your landlord has failed to abide by prior agreement with you concerning the painting of a disabled space or a covered space being provided you is not the issue as to your 60 day termination notice that you sent.


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