Is my landlord’s summons for an eviction legal if he made changes to my lease and forged my initials to acknowledge those changes?

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Is my landlord’s summons for an eviction legal if he made changes to my lease and forged my initials to acknowledge those changes?

In the summons I received from my landlord, he included a copy of my lease that he changed and forged my initials and didn’t include a signature page. I have the original copy of the signed lease and they are completely different, not to mention my forged initials. Also, he included a copy of a “Demand for Possession”, a 7 day notice dated the first of last month, which was paid in full and I have the receipt from the cashier’s check to prove payment was made. Are these things even legal for him to do?

Asked on July 22, 2011 Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

No they are not legal.  And if he actually filed the summons in court you need to go and answer it and claim that you were not properly served under thelaw with notice (generally a 3 day or 5 day notice) or with the summons.  The action will fall once the court sees that things were not properly done.  Landlord tenant law is very specific as to how matters are to proceed and if you mess them ip then the action is dismissed.  I think that you should get some legal help here and bring a copy of the lease he sent as well as all the paperwork involved.  It is hard to figure out all the pieces without reading all the paperwork.  Good luck.


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