If I bumped the car parked behind me and o damage was done, could I be cited for a hit and run?

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If I bumped the car parked behind me and o damage was done, could I be cited for a hit and run?

As I was reversing from a parked position I bumped the car parked behind me. No damage was done. Did I need to leave a note? I’ve seen many cars bumpers touch other bumpers of parked cars. It seems to be a very common scenario. When are drivers required to report (to other driver? insurance?) any contact with other autos no matter how slight?

Asked on October 16, 2010 under Accident Law, Washington

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

No, you are fine.  Really.  Although some may make a big deal about hitting the bumper of another vehicle, you I am sure, did not hit the other vehicle with enough force to warrant reporting it as an accident.  It is funny that really defining an accident is one of those things some attorneys never really think about.  You kind of know it when you see it.  But I am sure that your insurance policy defines it and you should look at that.  It is contact - but really collision - between vehicles, or a vehicle and property or a pedestrian.  But the contact must be severe enough to cause some sort of damage or injury.  Some states require a threshold of injury to even bring a personal injury action.   Good luck. 


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