When you turn 17 can you legally move out of your parents house?

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When you turn 17 can you legally move out of your parents house?

Where my dad lives and mom is moving, I won’t be able to graduate next year like I should because they require too many credits. My mom knows and understands that I want to get through high school and go to college to be an RN as soon as I can. I’ve been engaged for a while now so my mom has agreed to let me move out so I can finish school this next year. We plan on moving to the state of LA where my fiance’s family lives and we will be living with his mom until we get on our own to feet or until I graduate. All this seems to be perfect. Good school, close to college, bigger town, more opportunity, etc. However, my dad is not going to like this at all. But he doesn’t know me like he thinks he does. He is remarried and has a new family. He barely spend time with me and I only see him when I make the effort to go over to his house. I just need to know that since this is the law in MO, and that’s where he lives, can he do anything to get me back with him?

Asked on July 1, 2011 under Family Law, Missouri

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

At 17 you are still a minor and under the control of your parents.  You seem to be able to speak with your Mother here.  I would go and speak with an attorney in your area on the matter and bring Mom with you.  Is it possible for you to emancipate yourself with the help of your Mother? Although really I do not think that you can self support, etc. at this point, can you?  The child custody agreement that they signed upon divorce will have a bearing on all of this.  Who has physical custody of you as well as the right to make decisions that effect you.  You rally may have no choice here but to go.  SO speak with someone there.  And good luck.  


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