If you have small outstanding warrents in utah will they come to california if you have a family court case to pick you up?.

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If you have small outstanding warrents in utah will they come to california if you have a family court case to pick you up?.

Asked on May 4, 2009 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 13 years ago | Contributor

First of all there is no such thing as a "small warrant".  Don't think that just because this is a family court case that this situation won't be taken seriously.

Just because Utah has not yet come after you doesn't mean that it won't.  But it is conceivable that they may never come after you on their own.  Frankly, unless you're talking about a major offense, there simply isn't the manpower to track everyone down.  But know this, if you ever have any run-ins with law enforcement these warrants will turn up.  They could even turn up in something a simple as an employment background check and someone could turn you in.  California would then "extradite" (ie send) you back to Utah to face the charges against you.  And warrants never expire. Sooner or later you will be forced to deal with all of this.

You need to seek legal counsel.  A good criminal attorney can help you sort this out.  You only make things worse by hiding.  Besides do you want to live looking over your shoulder for the rest of your life?


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