If I sign a contract for work that requires I pay out if I quit, am I required to pay if I have not been yet been pais myself and I just started 3 weeks ago?

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If I sign a contract for work that requires I pay out if I quit, am I required to pay if I have not been yet been pais myself and I just started 3 weeks ago?

My boss is a miserable woman to work for and I am really wishing I had not signed a contract. I am to pay $5,000 if I quit before 6 months, $3,500 before 10 months and $2,500 before 15 months. I have not been paid yet and am willing to give her the income from the therapy sessions I conducted already if she would relinquish my from the contract.

Asked on June 20, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

From what little you have written about concerning the employment situation that you entered into the payment requirements as to you if you quit sounds as though they are void under state law and unenforceable as a violation of public policy.

With that in mind, I suggest that you consult with an attorney that practices in the area of employment law as well as have a meeting with a representative with the local department of labor near where you live.

From what you have written, it seems that you are owed money for work performed by your employer and would not be obligated to make any payments to your boss if you quit your job.


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