If I leave state on a DUI charge what will the police do to find me?

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If I leave state on a DUI charge what will the police do to find me?

I was charged with a DUI, I have sold my home and am relocating. What I’m concerned about is never living a normal life again. No bank account, no real job, nothing in my name that can be traceable again. What I want to know is what will the police go through to find me and have me brought back to this state to serve my time. I should also note that I will not be moving to a commonwealth such as PA. Is it legal for them to freeze my bank account and use that info to find me? What is legal to be done to locate me? Should I speak to a DUI attorney? In Knox County, ME.

Asked on September 13, 2010 under Criminal Law, Maine

Answers:

M.S., Member, Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

It is foolish for you to try to leave the state and dodge your responsibilities.  From a practical perspective, what will happen is that you will be charged with failure to appear on top of the DUI when you do not show up for court.  The court will issue a bench warrant, which will last FOREVER.  What this means is that if you ever get stopped by the police ever again for the rest of your life you will risk being arrested on the spot and incarcerated for these crimes.  Since you fled once, you will most likely not be given a bond that you will be able to post, so you can expect to be incarcerated.  The question will simply become "when", not "if."  Having this hanging over your head does not sound like a normal life to me.  I suggest that you deal with this pending case now, get it over with, and then move on with your life.


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