If I bought a car and 2 day’s later it breaks down as a result I missed a job opportunity can I sue the dealership for the car and my missed opportunity?

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If I bought a car and 2 day’s later it breaks down as a result I missed a job opportunity can I sue the dealership for the car and my missed opportunity?

I just bought a used car “as is” and it stalled out on me while I was driving it after owning it for just two days. I took it to a mechanic and they stated the car had various issues, none of which were disclosed to me except for a fuel gauge being defective. I did sign an agreement that the car is sold “as is” but nothing serious was ever disclosed to me. Furthermore the picture they had online of the car was of a completely different one. They said they would tow the car and give my money back. They did tow the car and now refuse to give my money back.

Asked on March 15, 2012 under General Practice, California

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you purchased a car "as is" it means you bought that car with no warranties. This means you run the risk of driving a car with significant mechanical issues, none of which have to be disclosed to you. The "as is" means you run that risk so you usually should talk to the dealer about allowing your own mechanic to inspect the vehicle before purchase so you can make an informed decision. You cannot collect on your missed opportunity of work because it was not agreed to in the contract and not foreseeable further you bought the car without warranty. As to the car being a different car than the one advertised, that is an issue of bait and switch but when you saw the car was different than the one you saw online, you could have indicated there was a difference. You can try to file a complaint with your state attorney general but it may not be successful in your favor.


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