I worked in New York. In 2005 I retired to Florida. My employer sent me a letter on august 2, 2012 stating I owe them over $73,000 for health insurance premiums they paid for my husband. In those

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I worked in New York. In 2005 I retired to Florida. My employer sent me a letter on august 2, 2012 stating I owe them over $73,000 for health insurance premiums they paid for my husband. In those

I worked in New York. In 2005 I retired to Florida. My employer sent me a letter on august 2, 2012 stating I owe them over $73,000 for health insurance premiums they paid for my husband. In those 7 years I was never once contatcted by the employee about any money I needed to pay or debt I was incurring. I spoke to the Assistant superintendent abd he stated that my retirement agreement stated I should have been paying each month but that people at the district were misinterpretting the retirement agreements. he also told me when I asked for a copy of my agreement and any correspondence sent over the past 7 years that he could send the agreement but letters and phone calls were never made. what do I do now? what are my rights

Asked on September 23, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

I find it odd that well after the fact (many years later) your former employer is now seeking reimbursement for $73,000 in health insurance premiums that it paid on behalf of your husband prior to 2005.

Most likely any claim for reimbursement would be time barred under the statute of limitations under New York law. I suggest that you consult with a Florida attorney to write your former employer a letter to such an effect.


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