What constitutes a hit and run and fleeing the scene?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What constitutes a hit and run and fleeing the scene?

I was picking up my sister and her friends after a night on the town. After I picked them up I drove through an intersection, which I had the green light in, but was apparently hit by a pedestrian on my front passenger side. It was loud in the car and I did not notice until several minutes later when my sister, who was in the passenger seat, said “I think some guy ran into you”. I was well past the scene and had a car full of drunk 22 year olds that needed to get home, so I continued on with my designated driver duties. Is this a hit and run, even though the accident was not my fault? And if so, am I liable for any injuries the pedestrian may have suffered?

Asked on June 1, 2013 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Based upon the fact that you were in an auto accident and knew such and did not stop you were involved in a "hit and run" which is a felony in many states if the damages exceed $500. I suggest that you consult with your claims representative for your insurance carrier over what happened. Whether you are liable for any injuries of third parties depends upon what the court or a jury decides if a criminal action is filed against you.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption