What shouldI do about repaying the state for unemployment benefits thatI should not havereceived?

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What shouldI do about repaying the state for unemployment benefits thatI should not havereceived?

I was laid off of my full-time job in 11/09; I was still working part-time at my other job. I never claimed to be completely “unemployed”, only partially. Every claim that I made up until 06/10 was legit. When they asked if I had been paid for the work week,Ii answered yes and entered the amount. However, in June I got a promotion from part-time to full-time assistant manager but Ikept filing the same amount that I had previously so that I could continue to feed my family and provide for them. Now, the state wants me to pay the full amount back, even though I never claimed to be fully “unemployed”. I don’t know how I am going to pay this?. What should I do?

Asked on January 15, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Maryland

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Tis is a very serious position and one that you need to resolve as soon as you can.  You may need some legal advice here and some legal clout to negotiate a repayment plan.  You are going to have to repay them the benefits that you were not entitled to receive so there is no getting around that.  Generally speaking most state the unemployment divisions will work with you on a repayment plan.  If money is tight maybe you can go and see if you can speak with a legal aid attorney or try calling your local bar associations and see if they have any pro bono (free) legal services.  Also try area law schools.  They sometimes have clinic programs.  Good luck to you.


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