If I’ve had 3 separate crimes against my property in the past 6 months and want to break my lease, do I have any legal recourse?

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If I’ve had 3 separate crimes against my property in the past 6 months and want to break my lease, do I have any legal recourse?

My car was broken into, my car was vandalized and my apartment was robbed in broad daylight while I was home. I’m trying to get out of my lease but the leasing agent is hassling me. The area that the complex is in is not a bad area. I was told there was a courtesy officer for the community and I’ve never seen him. It’s so bad the USPS won’t deliver to the complex because of theft and vandalism.

Asked on February 8, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Georgia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Unless the landlord actually knew that the location of the rental that you are occupying was in a high crime area and did not disclose this to you before you signed the lease, you do not seem to have a legal or factual basis to end the lease with your current landlord without recourse.

I suggest that if you want to end the lease without legal recourse with your landlord that you meet with him or her to discuss the situation. If the landlord is willing to end the lease early, then you need a written agreement signed by you and the landlord stating that the lease has ended early by mutual agreement and that no further rent will be required after a certain date.


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