What to do if I was at-fault for car accident while not insured?

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What to do if I was at-fault for car accident while not insured?

The damage was minimal, just a dent in the driver’s door, about 1-1 1/2″ diameter and 1/4″ deep. The other party filed a claim with their own insurance company which paid $1450 for the claim, based on one estimate made/obtained by their insurance adjuster, and they now require me to pay the bill. I found the estimate excessive based on the level of damage. I requested and got a copy of the estimate and found it was calling for the replacement of the entire door for just a little dent !!! First, shouldn’t the insurance company consult me before making the payment to their clients, since I am considered responsible to pay the bill? At this point can I contest the amount for repairs?

Asked on July 31, 2013 under Accident Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Based upon what you have written, you are entitled under the laws of all states for a detailed written explanation as to why the entire door of the damaged vehicle has to be replaced as opposed to only a small section repaired. I would contact the claims representative for the insurance carrier and the automotive repair place in writing seeking a written explanation for the charge for the entire door replacement and an estimate for the costs of repairing the small dent before you decide if you pay the amount or not for $1,450.00. By all means contest the charge. The insurance carrier was not obligated to consult with you before paying the $1,450 amount.

If you do not get a satisfactory explanation in writing your recourse is a complaint with your state's Department of Insurance and/or Bureau of Automotive Repair.


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