What are my right if I slipped on a wet floor at my part time job and severely broke my left ankle and tibia?

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What are my right if I slipped on a wet floor at my part time job and severely broke my left ankle and tibia?

I had to have emergency surgery on my leg and have a metal plate with 8 screws in my leg. I have been in the hospital and rehab for approximately 2.5 months. I am still not allowed to weight bear therefore I cannot walk. It has been a long road of pain and suffering and my ankle and leg will never be the same. The company refused to honor worker’s comp although I was injured on the job. My insurance from my full-time job covered my medical expenses until an attorney was able to get workers comp approved. I was blessed not to lose my lower leg due to the severity of the injury. I have a lot more rehab to go and will have to learn how to walk again. There will probably be a small percentage of disability because of the injury. Can I pursue my company for compensation for pain and suffering, etc.? This is not the first time I slipped on that floor and fell but no one displays wet floor signs or anything.

Asked on May 23, 2012 under Personal Injury, Connecticut

Answers:

Barry J. Simon / The Law Office of Barry J. Simon

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Assuming you are in California, you most likely have a workers comp. claim. Where were you working and what were your job duties? Who caused the water to be on the floor where you slipped, if you know?


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