If I received a ticket for doing 87 mph in a 35 zone mph and I have a mandatory court appearance, what are the consequences of each plea?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I received a ticket for doing 87 mph in a 35 zone mph and I have a mandatory court appearance, what are the consequences of each plea?

How should I plead? This is my first ticket.

Asked on October 15, 2015 under General Practice, Ohio

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

There are ways to contest a speeding ticket. You can contest it and hope that the issuing officer doesn't show up to court (if they do have an aternate defense ready). You could also claim that you were not speeding; ask what the exect reading on the gun was and just when it was last calibrated prior to your ticket being issued (request that all documents and other evidence be actually produced). Finally, you can argue that that even if you were speeding, it was excusable (e.g. the speed limit sign was obstructed or even missing completely - take pictures).
Bottom line, there are defenses to a speeding ticket. While you can defend yourself it might well be worth retaining an attorney who can present the best viable defense or at least minmize the damage. It could save you court fines and increased car insurance premiums.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

You're looking at a 4-point violation and a fine that will likely be in the $500 - $1,000 range fines vary widely by court. Meet with the prosecutor after checking in at court since you otherwise have a clean license, he may let you plead to a lower category of speeding e.g. going no more than around 60 or so mph in a 35 zone which will give you 2 points and a lesser fine. If offered a 2-point violation, take it it is very unlikely that you could "beat" the ticket entirely, so minimizing damage is your goal.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption