If I rear-ended a car but got scared so walked away from the scene and now go to the police station, will I be arrested or just issued citations to appear in court?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I rear-ended a car but got scared so walked away from the scene and now go to the police station, will I be arrested or just issued citations to appear in court?

I got scared and walked away from the scene. My car is completely legal and I have a good driving record. No violations. It has been 3 days.

Asked on September 14, 2015 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

Leaving a scene is an offense.  However, if you are up front about accepting responsibility, law enforcement tends to be more lenient.  Usually this type of offense results in a citation with a requirement to appear in court.... but considering that you did leave the scene, they could require you to post a bond to insure your appearance at court. 
This is not an easy situation to predict because much of what could happen depends on the personalities and procedures of the law enforcement agency handling the investigation. However, if you have a minimal history, you are not looking at major, over the top punishment.  This is a "pay some restitution for a dismissal" type case.  You just need to find a defense attorney that will help walk you through the process to get the dismissal.  You are not required to hire an attorney, but considering this is your first offense, invest in the funds to obtain one.  Many people show up to court, sign what they are told to sign, and then end up with a conviction on their record without ever really understanding what they just pled to.  They are just happy to be done, not realizing the long term consequences on their jobs, their insurance, or any other areas their lives.  Take an attorney so that you know what you are signing and what the consquences of any documents are. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption